Phase 2 underway for 17-home Lime Rock development

Phase 2 underway for 17-home Lime Rock development

The new East Lantern Road cuts between two Angell Road houses in Lincoln, leading to the future development of eight single-family homes by E.A. McNulty Real Estate. This is the second phase of a project approved by the Planning Board in 2006, which also included the development of nine single-family homes on Sables Way, also off Angell Road. (VALLEY BREEZE PHOTO BY MEGHAN KAVANAUGH)

LINCOLN - Seven years after the project was approved by the Planning Board, an eight-house development on the new East Lantern Road that connects Angell and Lantern Roads is now under construction.

This is phase two of the Sables Road subdivision project by E.A. McNulty Real Estate, which plans to create a total of 17 single-family homes on land subdivided for Leslie W. Sables.

Phase one was the development of nine homes and a new cul-de-sac on Sables Way, also off Angell Road. Development is still ongoing in this Sableswood development, as it has been named, with the street a mix of foundations, homes under construction, and completed houses for sale and already sold.

Tom McNulty, president, could not be reached by press time.

A listing on the E.A. McNulty Real Estate website shows a 2,500-square-foot, two-story home with four bedrooms, 2.5 baths and a two-car attached garage available for $484,900.

Technical Review Committee reports from 2006, when the projects were approved, state that concerns expressed by abutters at a public hearing on Oct. 25, 2006, led to the creation of three conditions to mitigate the impact on the existing neighborhood during construction: All construction vehicles and equipment should use the utility easement, a gravel access road parallel to East Lantern Road, as much as possible; an equipment and materials staging area must be set up on site and accessible from the gravel road; and the developer shall assign a field person to communicate with neighbors, keep the road clear, coordinate the schedule of work and control traffic, as needed.

Groundwater is "a significant problem" in the area, reports state, so no finished floors or basements could be constructed at or below the seasonal high groundwater elevation.

A private homeownership association was to control the design, ownership, maintenance and operation of a proposed sewer pumping station, which is available to the town in case of an emergency. The association was also granted responsibility for the development's water lines.