8 Tips to Rethink Clean at Home and On the Go

(Family Features) For years, terms like “clean,” “sanitized” and “disinfected” have been used almost interchangeably. However, if people have learned anything from the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s just because something looks clean doesn’t mean it actually is.

From high-touch surfaces to personal hygiene, many have focused more on the cleanliness of their homes and the businesses they visit amid the pandemic. In fact, roughly 3 in 5 Americans (57%) are more concerned about the cleanliness of businesses they frequent due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to an online survey of 2,504 adults in the United States commissioned by ISSA and conducted by YouGov. Further, more than half (56%) have thought about how clean a business or public space is during the past two years more than ever before.

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