Almost every sports fan in America will tell you all the reasons why Antonio Brown should never play another down in the National Football League. His stellar career is tainted with legal matters and team disciplinary challenges including the latest this season when he was suspended for faking his vaccination status.

So, for many, his coach included, what happened last Sunday is the final straw.

Mainstream media picked up the story and ran the video repeatedly because of the highly unusual display. Upset with something, at press time for this column still unknown even to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers organization, Brown took off his helmet and shoulder pads and hurled them to the bench, then added his jersey and gloves and tossed them to the fans in the end zone. Undressed from the waist up, he waved to the crowd as he ran off the field and into the stadium runway.

During the game.

To say it was strange would be an understatement.

Except for his quarterback, the goat himself, who after the game offered a blend of heartfelt and enabler guilt-ridden support, the pundits and fans were predictably quick to call for the receiver’s head. An embarrassment to the team and the league, a terrible example for the kids.

What was not predictable, privately to me, was my immediate personal reaction. Weirdly, I just thought, “I get it.”

Maybe it’s my second COVID battle before the holidays, and the worry about another in our house, who three weeks after most symptoms improved still can’t taste or smell.

Maybe it’s the four canceled holiday social events with friends when either we had COVID, were worried about spreading COVID, or because others had or were worried about spreading COVID.

Maybe it was the two-week postponement of my wife’s side Christmas observation, only to be missed by key members of the family anyway because they got, you guessed it, COVID.

Maybe it was my side’s Christmas celebration, scheduled for my aunt’s place in New York. We all agreed to test same day before travel, but some didn’t prepare in time to secure the precious store-bought rapids. Last minute, that traditional family day blew up too.

Maybe it’s the regular ping pong of heading to the office or working at home, depending on the level of COVID.

Maybe it’s because, once again, every time you think about heading out for dinner, calling friends, going to church, hitting the gym, whatever, you have to calculate your risk/reward factor because of COVID.

Maybe it’s the energy-sucking stamina and patience needed to suppress the urge to go nose to nose with the unmasked in the stores, quietly seething over that look they give you which reeks of, “I dare you to say something. I’m not afraid of COVID.”

Maybe it’s complete frustration with federal and state government for lack of tests, long lines, and quarantine rules that keep healthy people locked up and out of work while sick people run free infecting all they come in contact with.

You’ve got your own personal list of “maybes,” I’m sure.

And just maybe you can relate to that frustration displayed on the football field this past weekend, which some say is an example of America’s ongoing “great resignation.”

Mental health pros would likely advise Mr. Brown and each of us that when the “maybes” get bad, sometimes it’s good to just insert your yoga DVD, get in a workout, square breathe, or, if you have to, even yell into a pillow.

For now, and with only a little qualm, I’ll just vicariously enjoy the shoulder pads flying through the air.

Nice throw, Antonio.

Dan Yorke is the PM Drive Host on 99.7/AM 630 WPRO, Dan Yorke State of Mind weekends on Fox Providence/WPRI 12 and owns communications/crisis consulting firm DYCOMM LLC

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